a secluded place where I am not far from a tabernacle

Source: The Creative Catholic

In this article, K. V. Turley interviews writer and theologian, Dawn Eden Goldstein.

My father has always spoken of the power of the written word, but it was only when I became an author that I understood what he meant. Books change lives. It is a great blessing to be given the opportunity to touch the lives of readers, and I don’t ever want to take that for granted.

Read the full interview here

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all there gathered around a Mother?

Source: N C Register

We come to the end of the Turley trail. After this post, the London Catholic Writers Circle blog will return to being what it was intended to be from the beginning: a blog to help you write. We will see K. V. Turley’s articles, as well as those of other good Catholic writers but the emphasis will return to writing. Today, however, we join KVT at Walsingham, in the company of Anglican processors and Protestant protesters.

In the east of England lies its National Marian Shrine, Walsingham. From the Middle Ages it was a place of pilgrimage until Henry VIII suppressed the shrine. Forgotten for centuries, it was restored in the 20th Century. Today, it is a place of pilgrimage for Catholics, Anglicans and Orthodox Christians.

Walsingham boasts not one shrine but two – Catholic and Anglican. Despite ecumenical relations, each shrine, needless to say, attracts different pilgrims. It is the Anglican presence, however, which attracts the most vociferous opposition. A number come each year to protest. They must do so; after all, they are Protestants.

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what lasts is love, goodness, relationships to God and to other people

Source: Catholic World Report

K. V. Turley as CWR interviews Catholic journalist and writer Joanna Bogle.

CWR: What do you understand by the writer’s vocation?

Bogle: Truth. Nothing is more important than writing truthfully. Fiction can be connected with truth, too—the truth about human beings, the truth about God and people and relationships—things as they really are.

Read the full interview here

Visit Joanna Bogle’s blog here

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his eyes were on an altogether greater prize

Source: The Catholic Herald

K. V. Turley on Fr. Willie Doyle, a priest of the trenches.

Like so many caught up in the conflict that came to be known as the Great War, Fr Willie Doyle was buried where he fell, without a marker, just another casualty among millions. He might have been forgotten; however, it proved not to be the case.

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evil in our lives—in all its forms—must be drowned in a sea of goodness

Source: N C Register

K. V. Turley on the ‘re-emergance’ of an old threat who doesn’t know when he has been beaten.

Press reports in the last days seem to suggest that the French have rediscovered the devil. So much so that The Times ran an article last weekend that warned British holiday makers that they need to be aware of something not covered by their holiday insurance: diabolic activity.

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words have a way of showing up when they are invited

Source: Catholic World Report

In this article, K. V. Turley in his guise as ‘CWR’ interviews Vivian Dudro about her work as an editor for Ignatius Press. For the budding writer, the following Q and A will be of particular relevance:

CWR: What are the characteristics of a good submission?

Dudro: In a work of nonfiction, I look for clear, concise, and well-organized writing about a topic that interests me. The proper use and attribution of sources is also very important.  In fiction, I look for believable, sympathetic characters; a plausible, attention-getting plot; and not simply clear writing but beautiful, show-me-don’t-tell-me writing.

Read the full interview here

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it was not just prayers that were offered, but also tears

Source: Catholic World Report

K. V. Turley discovers a new religious order making its presence felt on the streets of Soho.

If you had visited Soho Square in the center of London on a recent Saturday night, you would have seen something unusual.

There is a Hare Krishna monastery just off the square. Each weekend, the monks march around it with drums and cymbals, chanting to honor their founder. They are as loud and raucous as the other, less spiritual, visitors to Soho—a quarter most Londoners associate far more with vice than virtue.

That night, awaiting the marchers, were two Catholic religious—two Sisters of Life, to be exact.

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